David Kakabadze (1889 – 1952)

Kweiseye is an art criticism blog written by Tom Kwei. If you enjoy this article, browse the archive here for more than 60 other critiques of both artists and exhibitions. Any questions/queries/use: tomkweipoet@gmail.com. 

A polymath of his time, David Kakabadze was not only a visionary avant grade painter, but an art scholar and innovator of cinematography. Within his sparse depictions there comes breathing room for his affecting technique. His imagery a subtle meld of leftist techniques and his native Georgia.

Rioni Power Station (1931)

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There comes a modern oddness to this painting. It feeling near inconceivable on initial viewing that it has crept from way back within the 1930s. Not only does the anachronistic sense stem from the small, soft concrete of the bridge that feels sharper than it has anything right to be, but via the mountains too, their base, expressionistic patches of surprisingly few shades creating a landscape more affecting than inspiring.

Nothing is given too much definition. The forests darkened deposits rather than detailed leafy canopies. At the top left there stand two solitary trees as guardians, the duo being of only a few trunks visible. Above this all the sky, stark in its realism, only serves to highlight the somewhat Fauvist approach to colours that Kakabadze has adopted. His world a take on the world rather than a fitful representation.

In spite of the blocky discipline though, movement does seem to dribble through here. The sun above falling majestically against the cleft of the world behind the power station, a single ridge, to which another tree watches, lying completely shadowed whilst the rest behind blazes indifferently on.

Sailboats (1921)

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Whenever faced with a Cubist image like this, I always scour the thing for traces or hints to which the title could be alluding to. It’s always best to initially center yourself this way I find, with Sailboats being an easy task for its sharp angles intersecting that resemble as masts. There also occurs small waves on the Sailboats, tiny ripples of water occurring within the white fold shape of the folds. There is little else to engage though.

The boat feels pinned up on the grey to be examined, a specimen. An origami rearrangement whose center folds inward, inverting the colours. This semi transparent shade behind is particularly well realised, the shapes below still visible and submerged beneath. Sailboats a simple puzzle of mental assembly that grows more complex as the subtle patterning of suggested colour are imagined.

Want to explore more paintings? Click HERE to see a list of all the art analyses on Kweiseye to date.

Kweiseye is written by @tomkweipoet

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The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2015

Kweiseye is an art criticism blog written by Tom Kwei. If you enjoy this article, browse the archive here for more than 60 other critiques of both artists and exhibitions. Any questions/queries/use: tomkweipoet@gmail.com. 

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A veritable smugglers cove of an art show, wherein huge varieties of new work hang together as disparate plunder, The Royal Academy’s Summer Exhibition is like no other exhibition at all. There is no theme, no single artist (rather, 1100 or so) and there are no rules for entry it seems. Only that the submitted piece be either sculpture, illustration, installation, or, of course, painting.

Whilst visiting London last weekend I ventured inside and spent the best part of three hours merely scratching the surface of the thing. The show, which is the oldest open-submission exhibition of its kind, is staged across 16 large rooms. With some of the designs, such as that of Jim Lambie (the stripes above belonging to his awesome ‘Zobop’) even spilling out of their predetermined spaces.

And though I must say that the quality was a tad patchy at times – something always to be expected with the nature of something so sprawling. There is routinely some excellence to encounter within this year’s Summer Exhibition and it’s well worth a visit. Here’s a selection of things that caught my eye:

Mick Moon – Noon Fishing/Dawn Fishing

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By stacking these two pieces one on top of the other, the inference comes of them being one complete, cohesive whole. The top , Noon Fishing, showing seagulls circling in the clouds. The lower portion, Dawn Fishing, depicting anglers working on the sea. Moon’s creative reapprproation of wood is a smart surrogate for both the sky and the ocean, all three of these entities being things with a sense of the eternal inherently embedded. All holding a feeling of permanence that far outstrips the things that ever depend on them.

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The use of wood is employed not just as metaphor by Moon though, but also as a very element of the picture. Such as in Dawn Fishing, wherein the knot of the wood itself appears to behave as rippling water beneath the casters. The paint and the material intertwining intelligently to suggest reflection and depth of shimmer on the canvas.

Holloway Back Gardens with Self Portrait – Melissa Scott-Miller

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A terrific, wide sprawl of an image whose detail sadly cannot be given real justice by my craned iPhone camera. This ‘self portrait’ of sorts (the artist can be seen on the left, her own image interestingly of a childish house) impresses not only through its scope, but its eye for the smaller universes of each garden depicted.

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Though perhaps slightly cartoonish at an initial glance, the charming style is of true vision and skill. Not only does the sun fall across the image with great accuracy, with the rays falling lazily across the various outcrops, but the whole thing has a biting affirming Britishness to it. A real for the back garden. All of them depicted here seeming to form an uninterrupted wilderness together, as if the houses are penning them back as one.

Sticky Toffee Pudding – Archie Franks

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Delivered through heavy throbs of pressed down paint, this depiction has a gluttonous weight to it far beyond the connotations of the humble treat it shows. Against a tame and mild flan coloured background, Franks pins us right up against the food at the front. Some of the desert has ran out of the middle, the exposed gooey centre seeming to lift off the easel as if rising lines of heat.

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From afar in the Royal Academy Sticky Toffee Pudding is easy to miss, both because there’s just so much around and also by the small size of the platter, effectively done to scale. Up close though there is a real vibrancy and aggression here, the thick globules suggesting anger and division – all within a pudding.

Olive Tree in a Field of Grass Feed – Paul Sayers

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And finally, here we are in a field somewhere. There comes a suggestion of pattern , the trees seeming to reflect each other’s place on dual parallel lines. Yet the mood is flagging and hazy rather than uniform. The technique rushed yet endearing. With the grass coming in thick, tense brushstrokes of definite crinkled green, whilst the leaves of the trees appear to flutter amongst their own celluar structures.

At the corner of the image another two lines cross as an angle, suggesting further patterning soon to be found off canvas. `

Want to explore more paintings? Click HERE to see a list of all the art analyses on Kweiseye to date.

Kweiseye is written by @tomkweipoet

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